AUTISM PREVENTION FATHER BABIES 24-34 PATERNAL AGE IS KEY IN NON-FAMILIAL AUTISMVaccines

"It is very possible that PATERNAL AGE is the major predictor of(non-familial) autism." Harry Fisch, M.D., author "The Male Biological Clock". Sperm DNA mutates and autism, schizophrenia bipolar etc. results. What is the connection with autoimmune disorders? Having Type 1 diabetes, SLE,etc. in the family, also if mother had older father. NW Cryobank will not accept a sperm donor past 35th BD to minimize genetic abnormalities.VACCINATIONS also cause autism.

Friday, May 25, 2007

Autoimmune Quotient

Source: American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) Released: Wed 23-May-2007, 16:05 ET
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Do You Know Your Family AQ?
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AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE, AQ, AUTOIMMUNE QUOTIENT, FAMILY MEDICAL HISTORY, MAJOR HEALTH CRISIS, WOMENS HEALTH
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The American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) wants to help you learn your family’s AQ. AQ is a play on IQ and stands for Autoimmune Quotient. It’s about knowing how likely you or a loved one is to develop an autoimmune disease, based on the prevalence of these diseases and your family history.






Newswise — The American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) wants to help you learn your family’s AQ. AQ is a play on IQ and stands for Autoimmune Quotient. It’s about knowing how likely you or a loved one is to develop an autoimmune disease, based on the prevalence of these diseases and your family history.

AARDA offers the following advice to help you determine your family’s AQ:

1. Understand that autoimmune diseases constitute a major U.S. health crisis. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), there are 23.5 million Americans who suffer from autoimmune diseases and the prevalence of these diseases is rising. In comparison, cancer affects up to 9 million and heart disease up to 22 million. Collectively, autoimmune disease is one of the top 10 leading causes of death in children and women under 65 and represents some $100 billion in annual direct health care costs. Yet, fewer than 6 percent of Americans surveyed in a recent AARDA/Roper poll could identify an autoimmune disease.

2. Get educated.
There are more than 80 known autoimmune diseases and an additional 40 diseases that are suspected to be autoimmune-related. The diseases themselves can affect almost any part of the body, including the kidneys, skin, heart, liver, lymph nodes, thyroid and the central nervous system. As a result, they cut across various medical specialties, such as endocrinology, neurology, dermatology, rheumatology, gastroenterology and hematology, among others. Autoimmune diseases include multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, scleroderma, polymyositis, vasculitis, lupus, Sjögren's disease, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), type 1 or juvenile diabetes, Crohn’s disease and Graves’ disease.

Autoimmunity is the underlying cause of these diseases. It is the process whereby the immune system mistakenly recognizes the body's own proteins as foreign invaders and begins producing antibodies that attack healthy cells and tissues, causing a variety of diseases.

Visit http://www.aarda.org for more detailed information and a complete disease list.

3. Be aware that autoimmune diseases target women.
Women are more likely than men to be affected; some estimates say that 75 percent of those affected are women. These women are usually in the childbearing years. In the past several years, autoimmunity has begun to be recognized as a major women’s health issue, with the Office of Research on Women’s Health at NIH recognizing it as such and the Society for Advancement of Women’s Health Research naming it as one of 10 diseases that most disproportionately affect women.

4. Know that autoimmune diseases run in families.
Current research points to a genetic component in autoimmune diseases. However, autoimmune diseases are not typical genetic diseases like, for instance, sickle cell anemia, where there is a specific gene mutation. With autoimmune diseases, multiple genes are involved that collectively increase vulnerability or susceptibility. Thus, what is inherited is not one specific gene but several genes that increase risk. As a result, autoimmune diseases tend to “cluster” in families - not as one particular disease, but as a general tendency to the autoimmune process and, consequently, different autoimmune diseases. For example, one family member may have autoimmune hepatitis; another, celiac disease; another, rheumatoid arthritis.

5. Do your own family medical history.
Given the family connection, knowing the health histories of other family members is critical. For example, if your grandmother or father or sister or uncle has an autoimmune disease, you could be more susceptible to developing one yourself. Take an inventory of your family health problems, expanding your research beyond your immediate family to include grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins and other relatives. Once you know your family history, share it with other family members and your doctor who can then assess the possibilities with a degree of accuracy and order appropriate tests.

6. Keep a "symptoms" list.
People with autoimmune diseases often suffer from a number of symptoms that, on the surface, seem unrelated. In addition, they may have suffered from other seemingly unrelated symptoms throughout their lives. It is important, therefore, to make a list of every major symptom you’ve experienced so that you can present it clearly to your doctor. List the symptoms in the order of concern to you.

7. Realize that getting an autoimmune disease diagnosis is often challenging.
An AARDA study of autoimmune patients found that the average time for diagnosis of a serious autoimmune disease is 4.6 years. During that period, the patient typically has seen 4.8 doctors; and 46 percent of the patients were told initially that they were too concerned about their health or that they were chronic complainers.

One of the factors that makes getting a correct autoimmune disease diagnosis so difficult is that symptoms can vary widely, notably from one disease to another, but even within the same disease. Also, because autoimmune diseases affect multiple systems, their symptoms can often be misleading.

The medical community’s lack of knowledge of autoimmune disease compounds the problem. Even though these diseases share a genetic background and tend to run in families, most health questionnaires at doctors’ offices do not ask whether there is a family history of autoimmune disease.

8. Hold the power to protect your family’s future health and well-being in your hands.

Congratulations! By working through these steps and doing your homework, you now have the knowledge to determine whether you or your loved ones could be at risk for developing an autoimmune disease.



Emmy Nominated Actress Kellie Martin Stars in New Autoimmunity PSA Campaign
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AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE, FAMILY CONNECTION, AQ, AARDA, WOMENS HEALTH, FAMILY HEALTH HISTORY
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The American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) launched its first-ever national public service (PSA) campaign titled, “Know Your Family AQ,” starring well-known actress and longtime AARDA spokesperson Kellie Martin.







Newswise — The American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) launched its first-ever national public service (PSA) campaign titled, “Know Your Family AQ,” starring well-known actress and longtime AARDA spokesperson Kellie Martin.

Unveiled on the steps of the U.S. Capitol at a patient rally earlier this week during National Autoimmune Diseases Awareness Month, the multi-media PSA campaign consists of 30-second radio and television spots, as well as a video interview with Martin (visit www.aarda.org to view/listen to all campaign elements). It is designed to educate Americans about the existence of the close genetic relationship and common pathway of disease among autoimmune diseases, which helps explain the clustering of these diseases in individuals and throughout families.

“AQ is a play on IQ and stands for Autoimmune Quotient. How likely are you or a loved one to develop an autoimmune disease? Given the family connection, knowing the health histories of other family members could help answer that question,” said Martin, who currently stars in The Hallmark Channel’s Mystery Woman series. “For example, if your grandmother or father or sister or uncle has an autoimmune disease, you could be more susceptible to developing one yourself. Therefore documenting and sharing your family’s medical history or AQ is key.”

Martin explained her starring role in the campaign, “As a new mom and someone whose family has been touched by autoimmune disease, I want all Americans to understand why knowing their family AQ is so vitally important.”

Martin’s sister Heather passed away at the age of 19 from a misdiagnosed case of lupus in 1998.

“Unfortunately, the Martin family’s experience is not uncommon since autoimmune diseases are often very difficult to diagnose,” added Virginia Ladd, president and executive director, AARDA. “Symptoms can be sporadic and seemingly unconnected and the diseases can affect almost any part of the body with unpredictable patterns of flare-ups and remissions. Thus most autoimmune diseases are diagnosed by a combination of blood work, clinical findings and a careful history, not only of symptoms, but also of a detailed family medical history.”

About Autoimmunity and National Autoimmune Diseases Awareness Month
There are more than 80 known autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, scleroderma, polymyositis, vasculitis, lupus, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), juvenile diabetes, Sjögren's disease, Crohn’s disease and Graves' disease. Autoimmunity is the underlying cause of these diseases. It is the process whereby the immune system mistakenly recognizes the body's own proteins as foreign invaders and begins producing antibodies that attack healthy cells and tissues, causing a variety of diseases.

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), there are 23.5 million Americans who suffer from autoimmune diseases and the prevalence of these diseases is rising. Collectively, autoimmune disease is one of the top 10 leading causes of death in children and women under 65 and represents some $100 billion in annual direct health care costs. Yet, fewer than six percent of Americans surveyed in a recent AARDA/Roper poll could identify an autoimmune disease.

To help raise Americans’ awareness of these diseases, the Senate recently designated May as National Autoimmune Diseases Awareness Month.

About American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association
American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) is the nation's only non-profit organization dedicated to bringing a national focus to autoimmunity as a category of disease and a major women's health issue, and promoting a collaborative research effort in order to find better treatments and a cure for all autoimmune diseases. For more information, please visit http://www.aarda.org or call 586-776-3900 or 888-856-9433.

About Kellie Martin
A seasoned television veteran at 31, Martin began pursuing an acting career at the tender age of seven. To date, Martin, who has been dubbed “One of Hollywood’s 10 Best Loved Stars,” has accrued an impressive list of credits and achievements. She is probably still most fondly remembered for her work as “Becca Thacher” in the popular ABC series Life Goes On for which she received an Emmy nomination for Best Supporting Actress. Martin later appeared as third-year medical student “Lucy Knight” on NBC-TV’s smash hit ER and, today stars as “Samantha Kinsey” on The Hallmark Channel’s Mystery Woman series.




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